1000 most common Latin words

Here is a list of the most common words in the Latin language. This list can be filtered by word type (nouns, adjectives, etc.. ) by clicking on the buttons below.

List of the most common Latin vocabulary words

  1. sum [verb] (to be) In most languages, the verb “to be” ranks near the top of the list of most common words, and Latin is no exception.
  2. et [conjunction] (and) An example of a Latin phrase containing this word is the expression: “adaequatio rei et intellectus” which means “correspondence of mind and reality”.
  3. qui [pronoun] (who) This common Latin pronoun is the origin of the words “qui” in French, “chi” in Italian, “quien” in Spanish, and “quem” in Portuguese.
  4. in [preposition] (in)
  5. is [determiner] (it)
  6. non [particle] (not) An example of a Latin phrase containing this word is the saying: “palma non sine pulvere” which means “no victory without effort”.
  7. ut [conjunction] (so that) This Latin conjunction is followed by the subjunctive. It appears in this famous Latin phrase by the Roman poet Ovid: “ut ameris, amabilis esto” which means “to be loved, be lovable”.
  8. ad [preposition] (to) This word appears in a Latin expression which is used in English: “ad hoc” which means “not previously planned but created only for a particular purpose”.
  9. hic [pronoun] (this) Latin is a language which doesn’t have definite or indefinite articles, however demonstratives such as “hic”, “ille” and “is” are among the most common Latin words.
  10. ab [preposition] (from)
  11. cum [preposition] (with) The Latin word “cum” is the origin of the words “con” in Italian, “con” in Spanish, and “com” in Portuguese. This common Latin preposition also appears in the academic expression “cum laude” meaning “with praise”.
  12. si [conjunction] (if) An example of a Latin phrase containing this word is the saying: “omnia dicta fortiora si dicta Latina” which means “everything said is stronger if said in Latin”.
  13. facio [verb] (to do) This basic Latin verb has many descendents in the Romance languages: “faire” in French, “fare” in Italian, “hace” in Spanish, and “fazer” in Portuguese.
  14. dico [verb] (to say) This Latin verb is the root of the English word “diction” which refers to the style of enunciation when speaking.
  15. ille [pronoun] (that one, he)
  16. possum [verb] (can) This common Latin verb appears in the phrase “possunt quia posse videntur” by the Roman poet Virgil, which translates to “they can because they think they can”.
  17. omnis [adjective] (every) A noun form of this common Latin word appears in the phrase “omnia vincit amor” by the Roman poet Virgil, which translates to “love conquers all”.
  18. suus [determiner] (his)
  19. de [preposition] (of, from)
  20. se [pronoun] (himself, herself, itself)
  21. ex [preposition] (out of)
  22. ego [pronoun] (I) In Latin, the word “ego” is simply the first person singular personal pronoun, and that is why it is near the top of this list of most common Latin words.
  23. sed [conjunction] (but) This short Latin word is very useful for expressing contrasts, and for articulating opposing ideas. This is why it ranks so highly among the most common Latin words.
  24. res [noun] (thing) The reason why this is such a common Latin word is that it has a wide range of meanings including “thing”, “event” and “issue”.
  25. ipse [determiner] (himself) A declined form of this word appears in the Latin expression “ipso facto” which means “by the fact itself” and which refers to a direct consequence.
  26. atque [conjunction] (and)
  27. tu [pronoun] (you) In this ranking of most common Latin words, not far below the first person singular pronoun “ego”, we find the second person singular pronoun “tu”.
  28. quod [conjunction] (because)
  29. enim [conjunction] (indeed)
  30. habeo [verb] (to have) The Latin word “habeo” is the origin of the words “avoir” in French, “avere” in Italian, “haber” in Spanish, and “haver” in Portuguese.
  31. per [preposition] (through) In addition to being used as a preposition, this word also serves as a Latin prefix.
  32. aut [conjunction] (or) This word appears in the following Latin phrase by Seneca, a Roman philosopher: “necesse est aut imiteris aut oderis” which means “you must either imitate or loathe the world”.
  33. alius [adjective] (another)
  34. autem [conjunction] (but)
  35. nec [conjunction] (nor) This common Latin word appears in the expression “nec plus ultra” which literally means “nothing further beyond”, and which is used to refer to the “state of the art”.
  36. etiam [adverb] (also)
  37. quis [pronoun] (who)
  38. quam [conjunction] (how)
  39. vel [conjunction] (or)
  40. do [verb] (to give)
  41. homo [noun] (man) This common Latin word appears in the expression “homo homini lupus” which means “man is a wolf to man”.
  42. idem [pronoun] (the same)
  43. multus [adjective] (much)
  44. meus [determiner] (my)
  45. magnus [adjective] (great)
  46. quia [conjunction] (because)
  47. tuus [determiner] (your) This is the possessive form of the pronoun “tu” which is higher up in this Latin frequency dictionary.
  48. noster [determiner] (our)
  49. tamen [conjunction] (however) This word is a synonym of the term “sed” which appears higher up in this list of the most common Latin words.
  50. ne [conjunction] not
  51. pars [noun] (a part)
  52. causa [noun] (cause)
  53. tempus [noun] (a time)
  54. nomen [noun] (name) This common Latin word is the origin of the words “nom” in French, “nome” in Italian, “nombre” in Spanish, and “nome” in Portuguese.
  55. filius [noun] (a son) The Latin word “filius” is the origin of the words “fils” in French, “figlio” in Italian, “hijo” in Spanish, and “filho” in Portuguese.
  56. unus [numeral] (one) Descendents of the Latin word “unus” are found in the Romance languages: “un” in French, “uno” in Italian, “un” in Spanish, and “um” in Portuguese.
  57. dies [noun] (day) The accusative form of this common Latin word appears in the expression “Carpe diem” which is translated as “seize the day”.
  58. ita [adverb] (so)
  59. nos [pronoun] (we, us)
  60. locus [noun] (place)
  61. pro [preposition] (for)
  62. modus [noun] (mode, method)
  63. rex [noun] (king) Descendents of the Latin word “rex” are found in the Romance languages: “roi” in French, “re” in Italian, “rey” in Spanish, and “rei” in Portuguese.
  64. deus [noun] (god)
  65. quidam [pronoun] (someone, something)
  66. debeo [verb] (to owe)
  67. iam [adverb] (already)
  68. primus [adjective] (first)
  69. terra [noun] (the ground, the Earth) This basic Latin word is the origin of the words “terre” in French, “terra” in Italian, “tierra” in Spanish, and “terra” in Portuguese. It is also the root of the English words “terrestrial”.
  70. nihil [pronoun] (nothing) This common Latin word is the root of the English word “nihilism”.
  71. pater [noun] (father) The Latin word “pater” is the origin of the words “père” in French, “padre” in Italian, “padre” in Spanish, and “pai” in Portuguese.
  72. neque [conjunction] (nor, and not)
  73. quoque [adverb] (too)
  74. corpus [noun] (body) This common Latin word is used in English in the context of linguistics where it refers to a collection of written texts.
  75. ago [verb] (to do, to act) This Latin verb is the origin of the French verb “agir” which features among the 1000 most common French words.
  76. iste [determiner] (that one)
  77. quidem [adverb] (indeed)
  78. opus [noun] (work)
  79. nisi [conjunction] (unless)
  80. populus [noun] (the people) The Latin word “populus” is the origin of the words “peuple” in French. It is also the root of the English words “popular” and “population”.
  81. nullus [pronoun] (none)
  82. liber [noun] (book) This basic Latin word is the root of the English word “library”.
  83. accipio [verb] (to receive)
  84. vero [adverb] (really)
  85. inter [preposition] (between) This common Latin preposition is also used as a Latin prefix. It appears in English words such as “international” and “interdisciplinary”
  86. bonum [noun] (a good thing)
  87. sicut [conjunction] (as)
  88. genus [noun] (kind)
  89. duo [numeral] (two)
  90. totus [adjective] (whole)
  91. animus [noun] (mind, life force)
  92. nunc [adverb] (now)
  93. sine [preposition] (without) This word appears in a Latin expression used in English: “sine qua non” which refers to an indispensable condition.
  94. ante [preposition] (in front) This common Latin preposition appears for example in the expression “honestas ante honores” which means “honesty before glory”.
  95. dominus [noun] (lord)
  96. bellum [noun] (war) This word appears in the Latin expression “casus belli”, which translates to “cause for war”.
  97. sic [adverb] (thus) An example of a Latin phrase containing this word is the expression: “macte virtute sic itur ad astra” which means “those who excel, thus reach the stars”.
  98. ubi [adverb] (where) This common Latin word appears in the saying “ubi amor, ibi dolor”, which translates to “where there is love, there is pain”.
  99. quaero [verb] (to ask)
  100. tam [adverb]
  101. scribo [verb] (to write) The Latin word “scribo” is the origin of the words “scrivere” in Italian, and “escribir” in Spanish.
  102. aliquis [pronoun] (someone) The Latin word “aliquis” is the origin of the words “alguien” in Spanish, and “alguém” in Portuguese.
  103. post [preposition]
  104. bonus [adjective] (good)
  105. alter [adjective] (the other)
  106. nam [conjunction] (for)
  107. credo [verb] (to believe)
  108. lex [noun] (law) Descendents of this basic Latin vocabulary word are found in the Romance languages: “loi” in French, “legge” in Italian, “ley” in Spanish, and “lei” in Portuguese.
  109. ius [noun] (right)
  110. ratio [noun] (reason) The Latin word “ratio” is the origin of the words “raison” in French, “ragione” in Italian, “razón” in Spanish, and “razão” in Portuguese.
  111. fides [noun] (faith)
  112. fero [verb] (to bear)
  113. apud [preposition] (at)
  114. igitur [conjunction] (therefore)
  115. an [conjunction] (or)
  116. quasi [conjunction] (as if)
  117. manus [noun] (hand) This elementary Latin vocabulary word is the origin of the words “main” in French, “mano” in Italian and in Spanish, as well as “mão” in Portuguese.
  118. lego [verb] (to read) Descendents of the Latin word “lego” are found in the Romance languages: “lire” in French, “leggere” in Italian, “leer” in Spanish, and “ler” in Portuguese.
  119. annus [noun] (year) The Latin word “annus” is the origin of the words “année” in French, “anno” in Italian, “año” in Spanish, and “ano” in Portuguese.
  120. mitto [verb] (to send)
  121. super [preposition] (above)
  122. exercitus [noun]
  123. natura [noun] (nature)
  124. ergo [adverb] (therefore) An example of a Latin phrase containing this word is the argument by the French philosopher Descartes: “cogito, ergo sum” which translates to “I think, therefore I am”.
  125. domus [noun] (house)
  126. tantum [adverb] (only)
  127. scio [verb] (to know)
  128. audio [verb] (to hear)
  129. actio [noun] (action) The Latin word “actio” is the origin of the words “action” in French, “azione” in Italian, “acción” in Spanish, and “ação” in Portuguese.
  130. mors [noun] (death)
  131. contra [preposition] (against, opposite)
  132. tum [adverb] (then)
  133. intellego [verb] (to understand)
  134. summus [adjective]
  135. publicus [adjective] (public) The Latin word “publicus” is the origin of the words “public” in French, “pubblico” in Italian, as well as “público” in Spanish and in Portuguese.
  136. peto [verb] (to ask) This common Latin verb is the root of the English word “petition”.
  137. sequor [verb] (to follow)
  138. puto [verb]
  139. aio [verb] (to assert)
  140. malum [noun] Depending on the length of the first vowel, this Latin word can either mean “an evil” or “an apple”.
  141. miles [noun] (a soldier) This common Latin term is the root of the English words “military” and “militia”.
  142. magis [adverb] (more) An example of a Latin saying containing this adverb is: “amicus Plato, sed magis amica veritas” which translates to “Plato is my friend, but truth is a better friend”.
  143. inquam [verb] (to say)
  144. pono [verb] (to put, to place)
  145. propter [preposition] (near)
  146. sive [conjunction] (or)
  147. gens [noun] (tribe)
  148. aliqui [determiner] (some)
  149. relinquo [verb] (to abandon, to relinquish)
  150. sub [preposition] (under) This common preposition is also used as a Latin prefix, which appears in English words such as “submarine” and “subtitle”
  151. loquor [verb] (to speak) This common Latin term is the root of the English word “loquacious” which means “chatty”.
  152. licet [verb] (it is permitted, it is allowed) This common Latin term is the root of the English word “illicit”.
  153. uterque [pronoun]
  154. dum [conjunction] (while)
  155. castra [noun] (camp)
  156. minus [adverb]
  157. Deus [proper noun] (God)
  158. morior [verb] (to die)
  159. reddo [verb] (to return)
  160. teneo [verb] (to hold) The Latin word “teneo” is the origin of the words “tenere” in Italian, “tener” in Spanish, and “ter” in Portuguese.
  161. iudicium [noun] (judgment)
  162. ceterus [adjective] (the other)
  163. mens [noun] (mind)
  164. quoniam [conjunction] (since)
  165. gero [verb] (to carry)
  166. frater [noun] (brother)
  167. solus [adjective] (alone)
  168. cognosco [verb]
  169. dux [noun] (leader)
  170. usque [adverb] (until)
  171. tantus [adjective] (so much)
  172. respondeo [verb] (to answer)
  173. pecunia [noun] (money)
  174. solum [adverb] (only)
  175. consilium [noun] (plan)
  176. utor [verb] (to use)
  177. soleo [verb]
  178. ordo [noun] (row)
  179. nascor [verb] The Latin word “nascor” is the origin of the words “naître” in French, “nascere” in Italian, “nacer” in Spanish, and “nascer” in Portuguese.
  180. secundum [preposition] (according to)
  181. semper [adverb] (always)
  182. caelum [noun] (heaven) The Latin word “caelum” is the origin of the words “ciel” in French, “cielo” in Italian, “cielo” in Spanish, and “céu” in Portuguese.
  183. praesto [adverb]
  184. duco [verb] (to lead) This verb is related to the noun “dux” which means “leader” and which is also in this list of common Latin words.
  185. satis [adverb]
  186. medius [adjective] (middle)
  187. iudex [noun] (judge)
  188. recipio [verb] The Latin word “recipio” is the origin of the words “recevoir” in French, “ricevere” in Italian, “recibir” in Spanish, and “receber” in Portuguese.
  189. sanctus [participle]
  190. deinde [adverb] (then)
  191. cor [noun] (heart) The Latin word “cor” is the origin of the words “cœur” in French, “cuore” in Italian, as well as “cor” in Spanish and in Portuguese.
  192. talis [adjective] (such)
  193. mater [noun] (mother)
  194. mos [noun] (custom)
  195. proprius [adjective]
  196. certus [adjective] (fixed)
  197. regnum [noun] (kingdom)
  198. tres [numeral] (three) The Latin word “tres” is the origin of the words “trois” in French, “tre” in Italian, “tres” in Spanish, and “três” in Portuguese.
  199. refero [verb] (to bring)
  200. patior [verb] (to suffer)
  201. appello [verb]
  202. inde [adverb] (thence)
  203. sententia [noun] (opinion)
  204. ideo [adverb] (therefore)
  205. gratia [noun] (grace) The Latin word “gratia” is the origin of the words “grâce” in French, “grazia” in Italian, “gracia” in Spanish, and “graça” in Portuguese.
  206. quisque [pronoun]
  207. tunc [adverb] (then)
  208. iudico [verb] (to judge)
  209. usus [noun] (use)
  210. singulus [adjective]
  211. oportet [verb]
  212. capio [verb] (to take)
  213. finis [noun] (end) This basic Latin vocabulary word is the origin of the words “fin” in French, “fine” in Italian, “fin” in Spanish, and “fim” in Portuguese.
  214. heres [noun] (heir)
  215. princeps [adjective] (first)
  216. unde [adverb] (whence)
  217. contineo [verb] (to hold)
  218. anima [noun] (soul)
  219. officium [noun] (office)
  220. potestas [noun] (power)
  221. trado [verb] (to surrender)
  222. ager [noun] (field)
  223. oculus [noun] (eye)
  224. urbs [noun] (city) This common Latin vocabulary word is the root of the English adjective “urban”.
  225. adhuc [adverb] (still)
  226. similis [adjective] (like)
  227. labor [noun] (work) This common Latin word appears in the phrase “labor omnia vincit” by the Roman poet Virgil, which translates to “hard work conquers all”.
  228. persona [noun] (mask)
  229. suscipio [verb]
  230. ob [preposition] (on account of)
  231. occido [verb]
  232. Dominus [proper noun]
  233. aqua [noun] (water) The Latin word “aqua” is the origin of the words “eau” in French, “acqua” in Italian, “agua” in Spanish, and “água” in Portuguese.
  234. nemo [pronoun] (no one)
  235. littera [noun] (letter)
  236. postea [adverb] (afterwards)
  237. nosco [verb] (to know)
  238. ibi [adverb] (there)
  239. caro [noun] (flesh)
  240. ignis [noun] (fire) This Latin word is similar to the Sanskrit word “agní” which also means “fire”. In fact, Latin and Sanskrit are both languages from the Indo-European family, and they originate from a common ancestor language called the Proto-Indo-European language. See this article on Latin vs Sanskrit.
  241. Deo [proper noun]
  242. quantum [adjective]
  243. principium [noun]
  244. uxor [noun] (a wife)
  245. communis [adjective] (common)
  246. species [noun] (sight)
  247. placeo [verb] (to please)
  248. honor [noun] (honor)
  249. ullus [adjective] (any)
  250. pax [noun] (peace) This basic Latin vocabulary word is the origin of the words “paix” in French, “pace” in Italian, “paz” in Spanish, and “paz” in Portuguese.
  251. amicus [noun] This simple Latin vocabulary word is the origin of the words “ami” in French, “amico” in Italian, as well as “amigo” in Spanish and in Portuguese.
  252. hereditas [noun] (inheritance) The Latin word “hereditas” is the origin of the words “hérédité” in French, “eredità” in Italian, “heredad” in Spanish, and “herdade” in Portuguese.
  253. humanus [adjective] (human) Descendents of the Latin word “humanus” are found in the Romance languages: “humain” in French, “umano” in Italian, “humano” in Spanish and Portuguese.
  254. quando [conjunction] (when) The Latin word “quando” is the origin of the words “quand” in French, “quando” in Italian, “cuando” in Spanish, and “quando” in Portuguese.
  255. spiritus [noun] (breath) The Latin word “spiritus” is the origin of the words “esprit” in French, “spirito” in Italian, “espíritu” in Spanish, and “espírito” in Portuguese.
  256. constituo [verb]
  257. hos [pronoun]
  258. redeo [verb] (to return)
  259. siue [conjunction]
  260. legatum [noun] (legacy)
  261. tertius [numeral]
  262. ars [noun] (art, skill, craft)
  263. cogo [verb] (to force)
  264. libertas [noun] (freedom) The Latin word “libertas” is the origin of the words “liberté” in French, “libertà” in Italian, “libertad” in Spanish, and “liberdade” in Portuguese.
  265. fructus [noun] (fruit)
  266. probo [verb] (to commend)
  267. transeo [verb]
  268. vos [pronoun] (you)
  269. aetas [noun]
  270. quisquam [pronoun] (anyone)
  271. possessio [noun] (possession)
  272. reliquus [adjective]
  273. mulier [noun] (a woman) The Latin word “mulier” is the origin of the words “moglie” in Italian, “mujer” in Spanish, and “mulher” in Portuguese.
  274. sanguis [noun] (blood) The Latin word “sanguis” is the origin of the words “sangre” in Spanish, and “sangue” in Portuguese.
  275. iubeo [verb] (to order)
  276. pes [noun] (a foot) The Latin word “pes” is the origin of the words “pied” in French, “piede” in Italian, “pie” in Spanish, and “” in Portuguese.
  277. eo [verb] (to go)
  278. coepi [verb] (to began)
  279. videtur [verb]
  280. nox [noun] (night) This basic Latin vocabulary word is the origin of the words “nuit” in French, “notte” in Italian, “noche” in Spanish, and “noite” in Portuguese.
  281. magne [adjective]
  282. lux [noun] (light) This basic Latin vocabulary word is the origin of the words “luce” in Italian, “luz” in Spanish, and “luz” in Portuguese.
  283. senatus [noun]
  284. simul [adverb] (at the same time)
  285. paro [verb] (to prepare)
  286. promitto [verb] (to promise)
  287. secundus [adjective] The Latin word “secundus” is the origin of the words “second” in French, “secondo” in Italian, “segundo” in Spanish, and “segundo” in Portuguese.
  288. signum [noun]
  289. spes [noun] (hope) This is the noun form of the verb “spero” which is also among the 1000 most common Latin words
  290. itaque [adverb] (therefore)
  291. ostendo [verb]
  292. bene [adverb] (well) This simple Latin word is the origin of the words “bien” in French, “bene” in Italian, “bien” in Spanish, and “bem” in Portuguese.
  293. os [noun] (mouth)
  294. iustus [adjective] (just) Descendents of the Latin word “iustus” are found in the Romance languages: “juste” in French, “giusto” in Italian, in addition to “justo” in Spanish and in Portuguese.
  295. restituo [verb] (to restore)
  296. patrius [adjective]
  297. peccatum [noun] (sin) The Latin word “peccatum” is the origin of the words “péché” in French, “peccato” in Italian, in addition to “pecado” in Spanish and ib in Portuguese.
  298. imperator [noun] (emperor)
  299. maneo [verb] (to stay)
  300. malus [adjective] (bad)
  301. praedico [verb]
  302. sentio [verb] (to feel)
  303. auctor [noun] (author)
  304. adversus [preposition]
  305. numquam [adverb] (never)
  306. verus [adjective] (true, real)
  307. mons [noun] (mountain)
  308. testamentum [noun] (testament)
  309. pertineo [verb] (to belong)
  310. tamquam [adverb] (as if)
  311. sermo [noun] (speech) This common Latin word is the root of the English word “sermon”.
  312. imperium [noun]
  313. quicumque [pronoun] (whoever)
  314. numerus [noun] (number)
  315. sensus [noun] (sense)
  316. Domini [proper noun]
  317. forma [noun] (form)
  318. oratio [noun] (speech)
  319. instituo [verb] (to establish)
  320. potius [adverb] (rather)
  321. fortuna [noun] (fortune) This common Latin word appears in the saying “audentes fortuna iuvat”, which translates to “fortune favors the bold”.
  322. arma [noun] (defensive arms)
  323. infero [verb] (to bring)
  324. proximus [adjective] (next)
  325. propono [verb]
  326. alienus [adjective] (foreign) In terms of its etymology, this word simply comes from the word “alius” meaning “other” which is also in this list of common Latin words.
  327. sacer [adjective] (sacred)
  328. gloria [noun] (glory)
  329. poena [noun] (punishment)
  330. sapientia [noun] (wisdom) This common Latin word appears in the saying “beatus homo qui invenit sapientiam”, which translates to “blessed is the man who finds wisdom”.
  331. fundus [noun] (farm)
  332. praecipio [verb]
  333. defero [verb]
  334. supra [preposition] (above)
  335. forte [noun]
  336. doceo [verb] (to teach)
  337. cura [noun] (care)
  338. offero [verb] (to offer)
  339. vobis [pronoun]
  340. cunctus [adjective]
  341. scientia [noun] (knowledge) The Latin word “scientia” is the origin of the words “science” in French, “scienza” in Italian, “ciencia” in Spanish, and “ciência” in Portuguese.
  342. salus [noun]
  343. possideo [verb]
  344. mundus [noun] The Latin word “mundus” is the origin of the words “monde” in French, “mondo” in Italian, “mundo” in Spanish, and “mundo” in Portuguese.
  345. praesum [verb]
  346. consto [verb]
  347. quisquis [pronoun] (whoever)
  348. consul [noun] (consul)
  349. consulo [verb]
  350. adeo [adverb]
  351. superior [adjective] (higher)
  352. equus [noun] (a horse) This common Latin noun is the root of the English adjective “equestrian” which means “related to horseback riding”.
  353. pretium [noun] (price)
  354. caput [noun]
  355. nolo [verb] (to not want)
  356. diligo [verb]
  357. muto [verb]
  358. quantus [adjective] (how many)
  359. amor [noun] (love) The Latin word “amor” is the origin of the words “amour” in French, “amore” in Italian, as well as “amor” in Spanish and Portuguese.
  360. auctoritas [noun] (authority) The Latin word “auctoritas” is the origin of the words “autorité” in French, “autorità” in Italian, “autoridad” in Spanish, and “autoridade” in Portuguese.
  361. confero [verb]
  362. exemplum [noun] (example)
  363. par [adjective] (equal)
  364. amo [verb] (to love) This word also appears in the phrase “si vis amari ama” by the philosopher Seneca, which translates to “if you want to be loved, love”. This Latin word is also the origin of the words “aimer” in French, “amare” in Italian, “amar” in Spanish, and “amar” in Portuguese.
  365. prohibeo [verb] (to forbid) The Latin word “prohibeo” is the origin of the words “prohiber” in French, “proibire” in Italian, “prohibir” in Spanish, and “proibir” in Portuguese.
  366. sto [verb] (to stand)
  367. altus [adjective] (high)
  368. prior [adjective] (prior)
  369. circa [preposition] (about) This common Latin preposition is also used in English.
  370. vita [noun] (life) The Latin word “vita” is the origin of the words “vie” in French, “vita” in Italian, as well as “vida” in Spanish and in Portuguese.
  371. scilicet [adverb] (of course)
  372. casus [noun] The Latin word “casus” is the origin of the words “cas” in French, “caso” in Italian, “caso” in Spanish, and also “caso” in Portuguese.
  373. consequor [verb]
  374. quilibet [pronoun] (anyone)
  375. longus [adjective] (long)
  376. efficio [verb]
  377. appareo [verb] (to appear)
  378. materia [noun] (matter)
  379. sumo [verb] (to take)
  380. legio [noun] (a legion)
  381. curo [verb] (to arrange)
  382. quattuor [numeral] (four)
  383. mare [noun] (sea)
  384. timeo [verb] (to fear)
  385. paucus [adjective] (little) The Latin word “paucus” is the origin of the words “peu” in French, “poco” in Italian and Spanish, as well as “pouco” in Portuguese.
  386. proelium [noun] (a battle)
  387. hinc [adverb] (hence)
  388. nego [verb] (to deny) The Latin word “nego” is the origin of the words “nier” in French, “negare” in Italian, as well as “negar” in Spanish and Portuguese.
  389. sol [noun] (sun) This common Latin vocabulary word is the origin of the words “soleil” in French, “sole” in Italian, as well as “sol” in Spanish and Portuguese.
  390. libero [verb] (to free)
  391. tot [determiner] (so many)
  392. prius [adjective]
  393. mereo [verb] (to serve)
  394. tollo [verb] (to raise)
  395. plerusque [adjective]
  396. absum [verb]
  397. lingua [noun] (language) This common Latin word appears in the expression “lingua franca” which means “common language”.
  398. utique [adverb] (certainly)
  399. dignitas [noun] (worth) The Latin word “dignitas” is the origin of the words “dignité” in French, “dignità” in Italian, “dignidad” in Spanish, and “dignidade” in Portuguese.
  400. qualis [determiner]
  401. puer [noun] (a child) This common Latin vocabulary word can be recognized as a root in the English word “puerile” which means “childish and immature”.
  402. statim [adverb] (immediately)
  403. multitudo [noun] (multitude) This Latin word contains the Latin “multi-” which means “more than one”. See here for a list of Latin prefixes.
  404. munus [noun] (office)
  405. necesse [adjective] (necessary)
  406. occupo [verb] (to occupy)
  407. aeternus [adjective] (eternal)
  408. exsisto [verb] (to appear)
  409. cur [adverb] (why)
  410. familia [noun]
  411. posterus [adjective] (coming after)
  412. traho [verb] (to drag)
  413. significo [verb] (to show)
  414. condicio [noun]
  415. studium [noun] (study)
  416. at [conjunction] (but)
  417. memoria [noun] (memory) The Latin word “memoria” is the origin of the words “mémoire” in French, “memoria” in Italian and Spanish, as well as “memória” in Portuguese.
  418. ira [noun] (anger) This common Latin noun is the root of the English word “irate”.
  419. iniurius [adjective] (unjust)
  420. intra [preposition] (within)
  421. item [adverb]
  422. defendo [verb] (to defend)
  423. nomino [verb] (to name)
  424. multo [adverb]
  425. lapis [noun] (a stone)
  426. periculum [noun] (danger) The Latin word “periculum” is the origin of the words “péril” in French, “pericolo” in Italian, “peligro” in Spanish, and “perigo” in Portuguese.
  427. cogito [verb] (to think)
  428. auris [noun] (ear)
  429. status [noun] (state)
  430. motus [noun] (a movement, a motion)
  431. audeo [verb] (to dare) This common Latin verb is related to the noun “audax” meaning “bold” and “daring”. This term can be identified as a root in the English word “audacity”.
  432. ultimus [adjective] (farthest)
  433. quippe [particle]
  434. committo [verb] (to commit)
  435. concedo [verb]
  436. parens [noun] (parent)
  437. ingredior [verb]
  438. omnino [adverb] (entirely)
  439. pereo [verb] (to perish)
  440. certe [adverb] (certainly)
  441. auxilium [noun] (help)
  442. desum [verb]
  443. sacerdos [noun] (priest)
  444. praeter [preposition] (except)
  445. verum [adverb]
  446. templum [noun]
  447. saepe [adverb] (often)
  448. ingenium [noun]
  449. adsum [verb]
  450. addo [verb] (to add)
  451. longe [adverb]
  452. oro [verb]
  453. facies [noun] (face)
  454. pugna [noun] (a fight) That this term is among the most common Latin words is perhaps a sign that the Roman civilization was not always the most peaceful. This term can be recognized as a root in the English word “pugnacious”.
  455. utrum [conjunction] (whether)
  456. ultra [preposition] (beyond)
  457. dubito [verb] (to doubt) The Latin word “dubito” is the origin of the words “douter” in French, “dubitare” in Italian, “dudar” in Spanish, and “duvidar” in Portuguese. The related Latin noun, “dubium”, appears in the Latin proverb “ubi dubium, ibi libertas” which means “where there is doubt, there is freedom”.
  458. dolor [noun] (pain) This Latin word is the origin of the words “douleur” in French, “dolore” in Italian, “dolor” in Spanish, and “dor” in Portuguese.
  459. intersum [verb]
  460. iustitia [noun] (justice) The Latin word “iustitia” is the origin of the words “justice” in French, “giustizia” in Italian, “justicia” in Spanish, and “justiça” in Portuguese.
  461. membrum [noun] (member) The Latin word “membrum” is the origin of the words “membre” in French, “membro” in Italian, “miembro” in Spanish, and “membro” in Portuguese.
  462. accido [verb] (to happen)
  463. necessitas [noun] (necessity) The Latin word “necessitas” is the origin of the words “nécessité” in French, “necessità” in Italian, “necesidad” in Spanish, and “necessidade” in Portuguese.
  464. haud [adverb]
  465. aer [noun] (air)
  466. eligo [verb] (choose) The Latin word “eligo” is the origin of the words “élire” in French, “eleggere” in Italian, “elegir” in Spanish, and “eleger” in Portuguese.
  467. colo [verb]
  468. flumen [noun] (river)
  469. apostolus [noun]
  470. depono [verb]
  471. procedo [verb] (to proceed)
  472. copia [noun] (supply)
  473. mox [adverb] (soon)
  474. decem [numeral] (ten) The Latin word “decem” is the origin of the words “dix” in French, “dieci” in Italian, “diez” in Spanish, and “dez” in Portuguese.
  475. diu [adverb] (for a long time)
  476. praetor [noun] (praetor)
  477. permitto [verb]
  478. postquam [conjunction] (after)
  479. rursus [adverb] (turned back)
  480. aurum [noun] (gold) The Latin word “aurum” is the origin of the words “or” in French, “oro” in Italian and Spanish, as well as “ouro” in Portuguese.
  481. spero [verb] (to hope) The Latin word “spero” is the origin of the words “espérer” in French, “sperare” in Italian, as well as “esperar” in Spanish and Portuguese.
  482. beatus [adjective] (blessed)
  483. tandem [adverb] (finally)
  484. exterior [adjective] (exterior)
  485. fere [adverb] (almost)
  486. regio [noun]
  487. quamvis [adverb] (however)
  488. futurus [participle]
  489. error [noun] (wandering) The Latin word “error” is the origin of the words “erreur” in French, “errore” in Italian, “error” in Spanish, and “erro” in Portuguese.
  490. angelus [noun] (angel) This common Latin word is the origin of the words “ange” in French, “angelo” in Italian, “ángel” in Spanish, and “anjo” in Portuguese.
  491. clarus [adjective] (clear) The Latin word “clarus” is the origin of the words “clair” in French, “chiaro” in Italian, as well as “claro” in Spanish and in Portuguese.
  492. dexter [adjective] (right)
  493. egredior [verb]
  494. sustineo [verb] (support)
  495. insula [noun] (island)
  496. miser [adjective] (miserable)
  497. accedo [verb] (to approach)
  498. plus [adjective] (more)
  499. ample [adverb]
  500. plenus [adjective] (full) This Latin word is the root of the English word “plenary”, most commonly used in the expression “plenary session” which refers to a session of a conference where all participants are expected to be present.
  501. retineo [verb]
  502. deduco [verb] (to lead) This common Latin verb is the origin of the verbs “déduire” in French, “dedurre” in Italian, “deducir” in Spanish, and “deduzir” in Portuguese.
  503. misceo [verb] (to mix)
  504. iter [noun] (a journey)
  505. ignoro [verb] (to not know)
  506. fortis [adjective] (strong) A related form of this Latin adjective appears in the expression “calamus gladio fortior” which means “the pen is mightier than the sword”.
  507. gradus [noun]
  508. donec [conjunction] (until)
  509. amitto [verb]
  510. praesidium [noun] (protection)
  511. existimo [verb]
  512. dono [verb]
  513. etsi [conjunction] (though)
  514. beneficium [noun] (benefit)
  515. irascor [verb] (to be angry)
  516. filia [noun] (daughter) This basic Latin word is the origin of the words “fille” in French, “figlia” in Italian, “hija” in Spanish, and “filha” in Portuguese.
  517. praebeo [verb]
  518. nescio [verb] (to not know)
  519. potior [verb] (to obtain)
  520. ferrum [noun] (iron)
  521. prope [preposition] (near)
  522. quamquam [conjunction] (though)
  523. metus [noun] (fear)
  524. recte [adverb] (correctly)
  525. saeculum [noun]
  526. unusquisque [pronoun] (each one)
  527. antiquus [adjective] (ancient)
  528. timor [noun] (fear)
  529. cado [verb] (to fall)
  530. competo [verb] (to meet)
  531. servus [noun] (a servant)
  532. interim [adverb] (in the meantime)
  533. color [noun] (color) The Latin word “color” is the origin of the words “couleur” in French, “colore” in Italian, “color” in Spanish, and “cor” in Portuguese.
  534. initium [noun] (beginning)
  535. fugio [verb] (to flee) The Latin word “fugio” is the origin of the words “fuir” in French, “fuggire” in Italian, “huir” in Spanish, and “fugir” in Portuguese.
  536. nobilis [adjective] (noble)
  537. inferus [adjective] (low, below)
  538. spatium [noun] (space)
  539. paulus [adjective] (small, little) This is the antonym of the word “magnus” which is also in this list of common Latin words.
  540. inimicus [adjective] (unfriendly)
  541. scriptura [noun] (a writing)
  542. rogo [verb] (to ask)
  543. persequor [verb]
  544. dimitto [verb]
  545. fama [noun] (fame)
  546. meritum [noun] (merit)
  547. acies [noun]
  548. subeo [verb]
  549. postulo [verb] (to demand)
  550. statuo [verb] (to establish)
  551. sapiens [participle] (wise)
  552. necessarius [adjective]
  553. tribuo [verb]
  554. creditor [noun] (creditor)
  555. multum [adverb] (a lot)
  556. dos [noun] (gift)
  557. sacrificium [noun] (sacrifice)
  558. religio [noun] The Latin word “religio” is the origin of the words “religion” in French, “religione” in Italian, “religión” in Spanish, and “religião” in Portuguese.
  559. impleo [verb]
  560. naturalis [adjective]
  561. ecce [interjection]
  562. aperio [verb] (to uncover)
  563. actus [noun] (act)
  564. mensura [noun] (measure)
  565. episcopus [noun]
  566. defungor [verb] (to finish)
  567. umquam [adverb] (ever)
  568. contingo [verb]
  569. vis [noun] (force)
  570. centum [numeral] (a hundred) The Latin word “centum” is the origin of the words “cento” in Italian, “ciento” in Spanish, and “cento” in Portuguese.
  571. exigo [verb] (to demand) The Latin word “exigo” is the origin of the words “exiger” in French, “esigere” in Italian, “exigir” in Spanish, and “exigir” in Portuguese.
  572. sedeo [verb] (to sit)
  573. iterum [adverb] (again)
  574. imago [noun] (image)
  575. condo [verb]
  576. forum [noun] (forum) This Latin word is the same as its English counterpart. English is a Germanic language which has not evolved from Latin, however there are still many English vocabulary words which come from Latin.
  577. murus [noun]
  578. iussus [noun] (command)
  579. mortalis [adjective] (mortal)
  580. dignus [adjective] (worthy)
  581. consule [noun]
  582. propheta [noun] (prophet)
  583. laudo [verb]
  584. excipio [verb]
  585. aliquando [adverb] (sometimes)
  586. nuntio [verb] (to announce)
  587. origo [noun] The Latin word “origo” is the origin of the words “origine” in French, “origine” in Italian, “origen” in Spanish, and “origem” in Portuguese.
  588. pietas [noun] (piety)
  589. disco [verb] (to learn)
  590. semen [noun] (seed)
  591. gigno [verb]
  592. vir [noun] (adult male) This common Latin word resembles the Sanskrit word “vira”. Both Latin and Sanskrit are languages which derive from the Proto-Indo-European language. For more on this, see this comparison of Latin and Sanskrit.
  593. rego [verb] (to rule)
  594. denique [adverb] (finally)
  595. specto [verb] (to watch)
  596. confiteor [verb] (to confess)
  597. abeo [verb] (to go away)
  598. pugno [verb] (to fight)
  599. taceo [verb] (to be silent)
  600. falsus [participle]
  601. affero [verb] (to bring)
  602. nondum [adverb] (not yet)
  603. lignum [noun]
  604. damnum [noun] (loss)
  605. consisto [verb] (to stop)
  606. similitudo [noun] (likeness)
  607. parum [adverb] (insufficient)
  608. censeo [verb] (to think)
  609. soror [noun] (sister)
  610. substantia [noun] (substance)
  611. magistro [verb] (direct)
  612. cedo [verb]
  613. profero [verb]
  614. descendo [verb] (to descend)
  615. ascendo [verb] (to go up)
  616. edo [verb] (to eat)
  617. instruo [verb] (to construct)
  618. obligo [verb]
  619. crimen [noun]
  620. ora [noun] (border)
  621. extra [preposition]
  622. impero [verb] (to command)
  623. dispono [verb] (to dispose)
  624. delinquo [verb]
  625. femina [noun] (woman) This Latin word is the origin of the French word “femme” which also means “woman” and which features among the most common French words.
  626. praetereo [verb]
  627. intro [verb]
  628. philosophus [noun] (philosopher)
  629. decedo [verb] (to depart)
  630. huiusmodi [adverb]
  631. obtineo [verb] The Latin word “obtineo” is the origin of the words “obtenir” in French, “ottenere” in Italian, “obtener” in Spanish, and “obter” in Portuguese.
  632. militia [noun]
  633. contrarius [adjective] (opposite)
  634. fatum [noun] (fate)
  635. quinque [numeral] (five)
  636. numero [verb]
  637. campus [noun]
  638. illic [pronoun]
  639. perpetuus [adjective] (perpetual)
  640. repeto [verb]
  641. praeda [noun] (prey) The Latin word “praeda” is the origin of the words “proie” in French, “preda” in Italian, “preda” in Spanish, and “preia” in Portuguese.
  642. percipio [verb] (to perceive) The Latin word “percipio” is the origin of the words “percevoir” in French, “percepire” in Italian, “percibir” in Spanish, and “perceber” in Portuguese.
  643. intellectus [noun] (understanding)
  644. Caesar [proper noun]
  645. integer [adjective] (complete)
  646. mando [verb]
  647. culpa [noun] (fault) culpa : This common Latin word can be recognized as a root in the English word “culprit”.
  648. contraho [verb]
  649. loco [verb] (to put)
  650. animal [noun] (animal)
  651. regius [adjective] (regal)
  652. supero [verb]
  653. testis [noun] (witness)
  654. corrumpo [verb]
  655. furor [verb] The Latin word “furor” is the origin of the words “fureur” in French, “furore” in Italian, “furor” in Spanish, and “furor” in Portuguese.
  656. tutor [noun] (guardian)
  657. incertus [adjective] (uncertain)
  658. coniungo [verb] (to connect)
  659. quartus [numeral] (fourth)
  660. creatura [noun] (creature)
  661. velut [adverb] (as if)
  662. amplus [adjective] (large)
  663. admitto [verb]
  664. tempto [verb] (to test)
  665. aufero [verb] (remove)
  666. exspecto [verb] (to await)
  667. via [noun] (road)
  668. praefero [verb] The Latin word “praefero” is the origin of the words “préférer” in French, “preferire” in Italian, “preferir” in Spanish, and “preferir” in Portuguese.
  669. quin [adverb]
  670. gladius [noun] (sword) The Latin term “gladiator” is derived from this word.
  671. iuxta [preposition] (next to) This common Latin preposition can be recognized as a root in the English word “juxtaposition”.
  672. lumen [noun] (light)
  673. damno [verb]
  674. resisto [verb]
  675. magister [noun] (teacher)
  676. pateo [verb]
  677. scelus [noun] (crime)
  678. creo [verb] The Latin word “creo” is the origin of the words “créer” in French, “creare” in Italian, “crear” in Spanish, and “criar” in Portuguese.
  679. discedo [verb] (to leave)
  680. exhibeo [verb] The Latin word “exhibeo” is the origin of the words “exhiber” in French, “esibire” in Italian, “exhibir” in Spanish, and “exibir” in Portuguese.
  681. merces [noun] (wages)
  682. laus [noun] (praise) This Latin word is the origin of the Italian word “lode”. As a Romance language, Italian derives from Latin, hence the similarities between Italian and Latin.
  683. consuetudo [noun] (a custom)
  684. quemadmodum [adverb] (how)
  685. diabolus [noun] (devil)
  686. regno [verb] (to reign)
  687. concipio [verb]
  688. cupio [verb]
  689. civitate [noun]
  690. facultas [noun] (ability)
  691. nimius [adjective] (too much)
  692. habitus [participle]
  693. arbitror [verb]
  694. desidero [verb] (to miss)
  695. iungo [verb] (to join)
  696. sedes [noun] (seat)
  697. deficio [verb] (to fail)
  698. definio [verb] (to define)
  699. pauper [adjective] (poor) The Latin word “pauper” is the origin of the words “pauvre” in French, “povero” in Italian, “pobre” in Spanish, and “pobre” in Portuguese.
  700. emptor [noun] (buyer) This word appears in the famous Latin expression “caveat emptor”, which translates to “let the buyer beware”.
  701. cesso [verb]
  702. aequus [adjective] (equal)
  703. aestimo [verb] (to value)
  704. perdo [verb] (to destroy)
  705. fundo [verb]
  706. doctrina [noun] (teaching)
  707. comparo [verb]
  708. porta [noun] (gate) The Latin word “porta” is the origin of the words “porte” in French, “porta” in Italian, “puerta” in Spanish, and “porta” in Portuguese.
  709. mora [noun] (delay)
  710. praefectus [noun] (commander)
  711. cibus [noun] (food)
  712. remitto [verb] (to send back)
  713. adhibeo [verb]
  714. male [adverb] (badly)
  715. ingens [adjective] (huge)
  716. dirigo [verb]
  717. dubius [adjective] (doubtful)
  718. expedio [verb] (to set free)
  719. oppono [verb] (to oppose) The Latin word “oppono” is the origin of the words “opposer” in French, “opporre” in Italian, “oponer” in Spanish, and “opor” in Portuguese.
  720. modicus [adjective] (moderate) This Latin adjective is the origin of the French adjective “modique”. As a Romance language, French comes from Latin, hence the similarities between French and Latin.
  721. praeceptum [noun] (precept)
  722. verbum [noun] (word) This common Latin word appears in the expression “acta non verba” which means “deeds not words”.
  723. interrogo [verb] (to ask)
  724. socius [noun] (associate)
  725. senatum [noun]
  726. potentia [noun] (power)
  727. pario [verb] (to bear)
  728. sors [noun] (lot)
  729. conficio [verb]
  730. fraus [noun] (fraud)
  731. adicio [verb]
  732. transfero [verb] (to transport)
  733. puella [noun] (a girl)
  734. stella [noun] (a star) This common Latin word is the root of the English adjective “stellar”.
  735. tracto [verb]
  736. pariter [adverb] (equally)
  737. opinio [noun] (belief) The Latin word “opinio” is the origin of the words “opinion” in French, “opinione” in Italian, “opinión” in Spanish, and “opinião” in Portuguese.
  738. cito [verb]
  739. incipio [verb] (to begin)
  740. demonstro [verb] (to show)
  741. facilis [adjective] (easy)
  742. facile [adverb] (easily)
  743. misericordia [noun] (mercy)
  744. iulianus [adjective] (Julian)
  745. opprimo [verb]
  746. plebs [noun] (common people)
  747. arbor [noun] (a tree) The Latin word “arbor” is the origin of the words “arbre” in French, “albero” in Italian, “árbol” in Spanish, and “árvore” in Portuguese.
  748. tribunus [noun]
  749. quomodo [adverb]
  750. fidelis [adjective] (faithful)
  751. viginti [numeral] (twenty) The Latin word “viginti” is the origin of the words “vingt” in French, “venti” in Italian, “veinte” in Spanish, and “vinte” in Portuguese.
  752. procurator [noun] (manager)
  753. nitor [verb]
  754. turba [noun] (crowd)
  755. differo [verb]
  756. cursus [noun]
  757. disciplina [noun] (training)
  758. honestus [adjective] (distinguished) The Latin word “honestus” is the origin of the words “honnête” in French, “onesto” in Italian, as well as “honesto” in Spanish and Portuguese.
  759. exceptio [noun] (an exception) The Latin word “exceptio” is the origin of the words “exception” in French, “eccezione” in Italian, “excepción” in Spanish, and “exceção” in Portuguese.
  760. compono [verb] The Latin word “compono” is the origin of the words “composer” in French, “comporre” in Italian, “componer” in Spanish, and “compor” in Portuguese.
  761. aliter [adverb] (otherwise)
  762. veluti [adverb] (as if)
  763. consulatus [noun] (consulship)
  764. impono [verb] (to put upon)
  765. diligenter [adverb] (carefully)
  766. conspectus [participle]
  767. utilis [adjective] (useful)
  768. custodio [verb] (guard)
  769. sufficio [verb]
  770. profectus [noun] (progress) The Latin word “profectus” is the origin of the words “profit” in French, “profitto” in Italian, “provecho” in Spanish, and “proveito” in Portuguese.
  771. hora [noun] (hour) This Latin word is the origin of the Spanish word “hora”. Spanish is a Romance language which derives from Latin. As a result there are many similarities between Spanish and Latin.
  772. exeo [verb]
  773. coram [adverb]
  774. finio [verb] (to finish)
  775. quaestio [noun] The Latin word “quaestio” is the origin of the words “question” in French, “questione” in Italian, “cuestión” in Spanish, and “questão” in Portuguese.
  776. fuga [noun] (flight, escape)
  777. magnitudo [noun] (size)
  778. videlicet [adverb]
  779. lateo [verb] (to hide)
  780. arbitrium [noun] (decision)
  781. emo [verb] (to buy)
  782. Christus [proper noun]
  783. noceo [verb]
  784. dolus [noun] (deceit)
  785. subito [participle]
  786. hodie [adverb] (today) This Latin word is the origin of the Portuguese word “hoje”. As a Romance language, Portuguese derives from Latin. This is why there are many similarities between Portuguese and Latin.
  787. habito [verb] (to dwell) The Latin word “habito” is the origin of the words “habiter” in French, “abitare” in Italian, as well as “habitar” in Spanish and in Portuguese.
  788. effectus [noun] (result) The Latin word “effectus” is the origin of the words “effet” in French, “effetto” in Italian, “efecto” in Spanish, and “efeito” in Portuguese.
  789. rescribo [verb] (to write back in reply)
  790. hostis [noun] (the enemy)
  791. cumque [adverb]
  792. ecclesia [noun] (church)
  793. decerno [verb] (to decide)
  794. caedes [noun]
  795. quotiens [adverb]
  796. perfectus [participle] (perfect)
  797. pronuntio [verb] (to announce)
  798. considero [verb] (to consider)
  799. epistula [noun]
  800. destino [verb] (to bind)
  801. quies [noun] (quiet)
  802. provinciae [noun]
  803. confirmo [verb]
  804. ictus [participle] (hit)
  805. Christum [proper noun]
  806. proficiscor [verb] (to depart)
  807. tenebra [noun] (darkness)
  808. Caesaris [proper noun]
  809. praetorium [noun] (headquarters)
  810. saepius [adverb]
  811. testimonium [noun] (testimony)
  812. felix [adjective] (happy) This basic Latin adjective is the origin of the words “felice” in Italian, as well as “feliz” in Spanish and Portuguese. This term can also be recognized as a root in the English word “felicity”.
  813. occurro [verb]
  814. cognitio [noun] (examination)
  815. caelestis [adjective] (celestial)
  816. voluntate [noun]
  817. utilitas [noun] (utility) The Latin word “utilitas” is the origin of the words “utilité” in French, “utilità” in Italian, “utilidad” in Spanish, and “utilidade” in Portuguese.
  818. intendo [verb]
  819. miror [verb]
  820. Romae [noun]
  821. stipulatio [noun] (stipulation)
  822. venire [verb] This common Latin verb is used in a famous Latin phrase attributed to Julius Caesar: “Veni, vidi, vici” which means “I came, I saw, I conquered”.
  823. antequam [conjunction] (before)
  824. odium [noun] (hatred)
  825. iaceo [verb]
  826. tego [verb] (to cover)
  827. profecto [adverb] (indeed)
  828. exitus [noun] (exit)
  829. vix [adverb] (hardly)
  830. durus [adjective] (hard)
  831. aedes [noun]
  832. cultus [noun]
  833. oleum [noun]
  834. adduco [verb]
  835. contendo [verb] (to stretch)
  836. tango [verb] (to touch)
  837. congrego [verb]
  838. impedio [verb] (to impede)
  839. septem [numeral] (seven) The Latin word “septem” is the origin of the words “sept” in French, “sette” in Italian, “siete” in Spanish, and “sete” in Portuguese.
  840. creator [noun] (creator) The Latin word “creator” is the origin of the words “créateur” in French, “creatore” in Italian, “creador” in Spanish, and “criador” in Portuguese.
  841. civitatis [noun]
  842. pecco [verb] (to sin)
  843. armo [verb] (arm)
  844. induco [verb]
  845. continuus [adjective] (continuous)
  846. mirus [adjective] (wonderful)
  847. debitor [noun] (debtor)
  848. insum [verb]
  849. careo [verb]
  850. primo [adverb] (first)
  851. penitus [adjective]
  852. tantummodo [adverb] (only)
  853. como [verb]
  854. desero [verb] (to leave)
  855. praemium [noun]
  856. orbis [noun] (circle) This Latin word is the root of the English word “orbit” which refers to a circular or elliptical recurring trajectory.
  857. excito [verb] The Latin word “excito” is the origin of the words “exciter” in French, “eccitare” in Italian, “excitar” in Spanish, and “excitar” in Portuguese.
  858. expugno [verb] (to storm)
  859. cogitatio [noun] (thought)
  860. impetro [verb] (to obtain)
  861. equis [pronoun]
  862. iuro [verb] The Latin word “iuro” is the origin of the words “jurer” in French, “giurare” in Italian, “jurar” in Spanish, and “jurar” in Portuguese.
  863. philosophia [noun] (philosophy) This is a word which the Latin language borrowed from Ancient Greek. Ancient Roman had its share of philosophers including for example Marcus Aurelius and Seneca. It is hard to know if philosophy played as big a role in ancient Rome and it did in ancient Greece, but it played enough of a role for this term to appear among the 1000 most common Latin words.
  864. adquiro [verb]
  865. accuso [verb] (to blame) The Latin word “accuso” is the origin of the words “accuser” in French, “accusare” in Italian, “acusar” in Spanish, and “acusar” in Portuguese.
  866. procul [adverb] (at a distance)
  867. occulo [verb] (to cover)
  868. terminus [noun] (limit)
  869. societas [noun] (society) The Latin word “societas” is the origin of the words “société” in French, “società” in Italian, “sociedad” in Spanish, and “sociedade” in Portuguese.
  870. vere [adverb] (truly)
  871. laboro [verb] (to work)
  872. edico [verb] (to declare)
  873. rectus [participle] (straight)
  874. effundo [verb]
  875. praeterea [adverb] (moreover)
  876. instrumentum [noun] (tool) The Latin word instrumentum is the origin of the words “instrument” in French, “strumento” in Italian, “instrumento” in Spanish, and “instrumento” in Portuguese.
  877. pendeo [verb]
  878. circulus [noun] (a circle)
  879. manifestus [adjective]
  880. expono [verb]
  881. sane [adverb] (reasonably)
  882. natio [noun] (nation) The Latin word “natio” is the origin of the words “nation” in French, “nazione” in Italian, “nación” in Spanish, and “nação” in Portuguese.
  883. voluit [verb]
  884. nonnullus [adjective] (some)
  885. remaneo [verb]
  886. immo [adverb]
  887. certamen [noun] (struggle)
  888. orior [verb] (to rise)
  889. obsidio [noun] (siege)
  890. mas [noun] (male)
  891. Hierusalem [proper noun] (Jerusalem)
  892. interdico [verb] (to prohibit)
  893. legatio [noun] (embassy)
  894. perduco [verb] (to lead)
  895. monstro [verb] (to show)
  896. erro [verb]
  897. mille [numeral] (thousand) The Latin word “mille” is the origin of the words “mille” in French, “mille” in Italian, “mil” in Spanish, and “mil” in Portuguese.
  898. colligo [verb]
  899. quare [adverb] (whereby)
  900. proprie [adjective]
  901. prodeo [verb]
  902. tempero [verb] (to temper)
  903. umbra [noun] (a shadow) This common Latin word is the root of the English word “umbrella”.
  904. Italia [proper noun] (Italy)
  905. flamma [noun] (flame)
  906. felicitas [noun] (happiness) The Latin word “felicitas” is the origin of the words “félicité” in French, “felicità” in Italian, “felicidad” in Spanish, and “felicidade” in Portuguese.
  907. pupillus [noun] (orphan)
  908. moneo [verb] (to advise)
  909. nonne [adverb] (not)
  910. sacramentum [noun]
  911. simplex [adjective] (simple)
  912. pector [verb]
  913. possessor [noun] (possessor)
  914. decet [verb] (seemly)
  915. neglego [verb] (to neglect)
  916. incido [verb]
  917. adoro [verb]
  918. suburbanus [adjective]
  919. testor [verb]
  920. obligatio [noun] (obligation) The Latin word “obligatio” is the origin of the words “obligation” in French, “obbligazione” in Italian, “obligación” in Spanish, and “obrigação” in Portuguese.
  921. supplex [adjective] (kneeling)
  922. auro [verb]
  923. idoneus [adjective] (suitable)
  924. olim [adverb] (once upon a time)
  925. reperio [verb] (to find)
  926. prudentia [noun] (prudence) The Latin word “prudentia” is the origin of the words “prudence” in French, “prudenza” in Italian, “prudencia” in Spanish, and “prudência” in Portuguese.
  927. divina [adjective]
  928. porro [adverb] (onward)
  929. indico [verb] (to indicate)
  930. extendo [verb] (to extend)
  931. gratus [adjective] (pleasing) An inflected form of this adjective appears in the Latin expression “persona non grata” which literally means “person not pleasing” and which refers to an “unwelcome person”.
  932. fallo [verb] (to deceive)
  933. valde [adverb] (very)
  934. mandatum [noun] (command)
  935. requiro [verb] (to require)
  936. argumentum [noun] (argument)
  937. prex [noun] (prayer)
  938. succedo [verb] (to climb)
  939. triginta [numeral] (thirty)
  940. discrimen [noun]
  941. emitto [verb] (to hurl)
  942. testator [noun] (witness)
  943. commendo [verb] (to recommend)
  944. experior [verb] (to try)
  945. paco [verb] (to pacify) The Latin word “paco” is the origin of the words “payer” in French, “pagare” in Italian, “pagar” in Spanish, and “pagar” in Portuguese.
  946. celebro [verb]
  947. amnis [noun] (river)
  948. memoro [verb]
  949. tergo [verb]
  950. commodus [adjective] (comfortable)
  951. furtum [noun] (theft)
  952. interficio [verb] (to kill)
  953. quiesco [verb] (to rest)
  954. praeparo [verb] (to prepare)
  955. videatur [verb]
  956. vitam [noun]
  957. sino [verb] (to permit)
  958. matrimonium [noun] (marriage)
  959. Paulus [proper noun]
  960. exerceo [verb] (to exercise)
  961. spons [noun] (free will)
  962. momentum [noun]
  963. comedo [verb]
  964. excello [verb]
  965. comprehendo [verb] (to catch) The Latin word “comprehendo” is the origin of the words “comprendre” in French, “comprendere” in Italian, and “comprender” in Spanish.
  966. priusquam [conjunction] (before)
  967. praepono [verb]
  968. virtute [noun] (by virtue)
  969. impendo [verb]
  970. desino [verb] (to cease)
  971. curia [noun] (court)
  972. poeta [noun] (poet)
  973. vestrum [pronoun]
  974. occasio [noun] (occasion) The Latin word “occasio” is the origin of the words “occasion” in French, “occasione” in Italian, “ocasión” in Spanish, and “ocasião” in Portuguese.
  975. prosum [verb] (to benefit)
  976. consumo [verb] (to consume)
  977. penes [preposition]
  978. semel [adverb] (once)
  979. subicio [verb]
  980. munio [verb] (to fortify)
  981. rapio [verb]
  982. pontifex [noun]
  983. urbes [noun]
  984. oppugno [verb] (to attack)
  985. circuitus [noun] (circuit)
  986. gaudeo [verb]
  987. Romanus [adjective]
  988. repens [participle] (crawling)
  989. subdo [verb]
  990. impetus [noun]
  991. turbo [noun]
  992. opinor [verb]
  993. duplex [adjective] (double)
  994. latro [noun] (robber) The Latin word “latro” is the root of the English word “larceny” which is a synonym of “theft”.
  995. paternus [adjective] (paternal) This adjective is derived by adding the suffix “-nus” to the noun “pater” which means “father” and which is also in this list of most common Latin words.
  996. protinus [adverb] (immediately)
  997. licentia [noun] (a license)
  998. respicio [verb]
  999. aequor [noun]
  1000. adiungo [verb] (to add)
  1001. argentum [noun] (silver)
  1002. turpis [adjective] (ugly)
  1003. condemno [verb] (to condemn)
  1004. inclino [verb] (to bend)
  1005. difficilis [adjective] (difficult) The Latin word “difficilis” is the origin of the words “difficile” in French, “difficile” in Italian, “difícil” in Spanish, and “difícil” in Portuguese. This word’s antonym, “facilis” is also in this list of the most common Latin words.
  1006. titulus [noun]
  1007. nimis [adverb] (too much)
  1008. inanis [adjective] (empty)
  1009. parco [verb]
  1010. ordino [verb] (to arrange)
  1011. patro [verb] (to accomplish)
  1012. desiderium [noun] (desire)
  1013. punio [verb]
  1014. ripa [noun] (the bank of a river, or seashore)
  1015. animo [verb] (to animate)
  1016. pignus [noun] (pledge)
  1017. ultro [adverb] (beyond)
  1018. nuptiae [noun] (marriage)
  1019. clamo [verb]
  1020. tempestas [noun] (weather)
  1021. praemitto [verb]
  1022. iniquus [adjective] (unjust)
  1023. excedo [verb] (to withdraw)
  1024. separo [verb] (to divide)
  1025. vult [verb]
  1026. memini [verb] (to remember)
  1027. declino [verb] (decline)
  1028. supplicium [noun] (punishment)
  1029. distinguo [verb] (to distinguish)
  1030. minuo [verb] (reduce)
  1031. plane [adverb] (clearly)
  1032. sublimis [adjective] (high)
  1033. donum [noun] (gift)
  1034. militaris [adjective]
  1035. Italiam [proper noun]
  1036. terror [noun] (terror)
  1037. pondus [noun] (weight)
  1038. terrenus [adjective] (earthly)
  1039. sapio [verb]
  1040. prae [adverb] (before)
  1041. defensio [noun]
  1042. universus [adjective] (entire) This Latin word contains the Latin “uni-” which means ““one” or “single”. See here for a list of Latin prefixes.
  1043. reficio [verb] (to rebuild)
  1044. frumentum [noun] (corn)
  1045. agnosco [verb] (to recognize)
  1046. orator [noun] (orator)
  1047. cornus [noun]
  1048. cerno [verb] (to separate)
  1049. defensor [noun]
  1050. recedo [verb] (to go back)
  1051. educo [verb] The Latin word “educo” is the origin of the words “éduquer” in French, “educare” in Italian, “educar” in Spanish, and “educar” in Portuguese.
  1052. Iudas [proper noun]